A somewhat random collection... Some are publications by other radical history projects, others, other interesting items we inherited, some published by friends and comrades...

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Other People's Publications

 

• Science and Capital
Radical Essays on Science and technology

Livewire Publications
£6.00

A collection of some of the most radical essays on science and technology in order to highlight some of the dangers inherent in the naive trust people place in science and scientific experts. A myopic faith in science runs throughout modernity and needs to be critiqued. It is hoped that this collection will stimulate an analysis and critique of modern science.



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• Bending the Bars
John Barker
£5.00

An autobiographical account of the prison years of John Barker, convicted in the 1972 Angry Brigade trial and sentenced to ten years imprisonment.

 


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• Occupational Therapy
The Incomplete Story of the University College Hospital Strikes and occupations of 1992-94.

£0.50

The story of a Struggle to keep a hospital open despite the efforts of the government, the Area health Authority, management, University College London, and the Wellcome Foundation and Trust.

 



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• Strangeways: A Serious Disturbance
Nicki Jameson & Eric Allison
£3.00

The inside story of the biggest protest in the history of the British prison system, told through the eyewitness accounts of prisoners and ex-prisoners, their families and supporters. The Strangeways revolt exposed the squalid conditions and brutal atmosphere of Britain's local prisons to public scrutiny and forced the government to commission the Woolf Inquiry, the most far-reaching examination ever of the state of British prisons.




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• To the Castle!
Tracing the history of the 1831 reform riots in Nottingham.

£3.00

Published by People’s Histreh: Nottingham Radical History Group

 



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• Anti-Fascist!
Martin Wright
£5.00

It is the 1970s, and racism, especially in the form of the National Front, is getting worse, much worse.
Anti-Fascist is the personal account, written from a strictly working class perspective, of the street fighting that took place to defeat the racists – Brick lane, Wood Green, Southall, Lewisham and more.

 


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• Thomas Paine’s Republic of Reason
David Nash
£1.50

A brief look at the ideas of eighteenth
century republican Thomas Paine.

 

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• Babies & Bunny Rabbits
Dan Chatterton
£1.25
Freethought History Research Group

London’s leading nineteenth century atheist communist writes on birth control.




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• Hell Devils & Damnation
Or the Deeds of a Bloodstained God

Dan Chatterton
£1.25
Freethought History Research Group

Reflections on religion from the atheistic communist scorcher himself. Amen.

 


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• We Come for Our Own and Shall have it:
Smuggling in Poole and Dorset

Kevin Davis
£2.00
Bristol Radical History Group




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• The Bristol Manifesto:
The 2008 G8 in Hokkaido: A Strategic assessment

£2.00
Bristol Radical History Group

When Bristol Radical History Group staged a series of events called Down With the Fences! The Struggle for the Global Commons, in May 2008, a group of leading academics found themselves together in an Eastville living room. They talked about what they would like to say to the leaders of the G8 countries who were soon to meet in Hokkaido, Japan. This is the result of their discussion.




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• Yesterday’s Tomorrow: Bristol's Garden Suburbs
Stephen E Hunt
£2.00
Bristol Radical History Group

In 1909, the Bristol Garden Suburb Limited was set up to implement the ideas Ebenezer Howard popularized in ‘Tomorrow: A Peaceful Path to Real Reform’, first published in 1898. Garden-City principles inspired promising developments at Shirehampton, Sea Mills, and Keynsham chocolate factory, but were diluted in the construction of Brisol’s interwar housing estates at Knowle West and Bedminster, Hillfields, Southmead, Horfield, Speedwell and St Annes. Today it’s timely to revisit Howard’s ideas in the light of several topics of green chatter – transition towns, peak oil and Gordon Brown’s intention to promote the construction of eco-towns.

 



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• Bristol & the Labour Unrest of 1910-14
Mike Richardson
£2.00
Bristol Radical History Group

1910 saw a renewed outbreak of industrial strife, as significant sections of the trade union rank-and-file began to express their frustration at the lack of progress made in their struggle for better working conditions and a new social order. Strikes reached levels not seen since the ‘new unionism’ upsurge of 1889-92. Workers unrest combined with clashes over Home Rule for Ireland, and the militant tactics of suffrage campaigners, which added to the problems of the ruling class. Confronted by these parallel rebellions the ruling class feared their convergence and some warned of the danger of revolution.
This pamphlet charts Bristol’s experience of industrial strife between 1910 and the outbreak of the First World War, in August 1914. Rather than focus on some of Bristol’s famous union leaders such as Ben Tillett and Earnest Bevin, this account scrutinises the events from the union rank-and-file perspective.



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• The Life & Family of William Penn:
260 Years of Bloody Colonial History

Jim McNeill

£2.00
Bristol Radical History Group

This booklet is a short analysis of the role of the Penn family and other early Quakers in the Transatlantic Slave Trade and European expansionism in the North Americas.
The links between the different generations of the Penn family, has never before been told. It is pertinent to ask, “Why is this so?” The Penn family was at the heart of the English Revolution in the 17th Century but also of every important event of British colonial expansionism from the colonisation of Ireland, Jamaica and the East Coast of North America. Yet, especially in Bristol, where the family had such strong connections, citizens are unaware of either the Penn family’s role in shaping the way we live or that their actions created social and class tensions that are still being played out today.




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• Bristol Independent Labour Party
June Hannam
£2.00
Bristol Radical History Group

During World War One a significant minority of women and men throughout the country took part in a peace movement. They demanded the democratic control of foreign policy, a negotiated peace and a just, non- punitive settlement at the end of the conflict. They also joined with the wider labour movement to oppose conscription. The nature of the anti- war movement, its leadership and the alliances made varied from city to city. In Bristol it was socialists of the Independent Labour Party who provided much of the energy and personnel for the campaign. This pamphlet explores the activities and ideas of women and men of the ILP, including Walter Ayles, Annie Townley and Mabel Tothill. It examines the significance of friendship ties and cross party alliances, some of which were forged in the pre-war suffrage campaign. It also assesses the impact of peace activism on labour and gender politics in the city.



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• Cry Freedom, Cry Seven Stars:
Thomas Clarkson In Bristol, 1787

Mark Steeds

£2.00
Bristol Radical History Group

During 1787 abolitionist Thomas Clarkson started his research into the slave trade in Bristol. This pamphlet looks at how the histories of this pub and the abolition movement are intertwined and also some of the remarkable coincidences that link the name ‘Seven Stars’ with the slave trade.
The 1st edition was published to raise money for the Seven Stars Plaque; now completely rewritten and revised, it celebrates the completion of the plaque project and launches a new challenge – to make the Seven Stars the first pub to have UNESCO World Heritage status.




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• Pirates to Proletarians
The Experience of the Pilots and Watermen of Crockerne Pill in the Nineteenth Century

Mike Richardson

£2.00
Bristol Radical History Group

This pamphlet charts the experiences, in the nineteenth century, of Bristol’s pilots, navigated ships through the dangerous waters of the Bristol Channel and up the river Avon, with its twisting bends, shifting sand banks and strong currents, in their struggle to defend their jobs and their traditional way of working, particularly as steam power emerged to replace sail. Their relationship with the shipowners, masters and city authorities was a complex one, and broke down periodically into open conflict. They lived almost exclusively in Crockerne Pill, a small village, five miles from Bristol, situated on the south side of the river Avon. Pill people exhibited a lack of deference and were looked upon by the Bristol authorities, and many town-dwellers, as disorderly and difficult. As the nineteenth century progressed, however, the realization took hold that the interests of the pilots and watermen of Pill had much in common with trade unionists in Bristol and the wider labour movement.

 


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• Bread Or Batons?
Unemployed Workers Struggles in 1930s Bristol

Roger Ball & Dave Backwith

£2.00
Bristol Radical History Group
 
The banking crisis of 2008 and the following deep recession experienced by the world economy have led to mass unemployment and poverty in the U.K. Massive public sector cuts along with huge financial bonuses for the wealthy have exacerbated the systemic divisions between ‘rich and poor’ which lie at the heart of the neo-liberal economy. For many commentators the spectre of economic depression has raised its ugly head once again. It thus seems apt to look back at Bristol in the period of the last ‘great depression’ in the 1930s to see what was occurring. There are numerous parallels with today in this text, from cuts in poor relief and public services, a collaborationist and emasculated Labour opposition, to the brutal policing of demonstrations and a corrupt and reactionary media. In all this misery, however, the commitment and actions of unemployed Bristolians shine out giving us both hope as well as lessons learned.



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• The Origins and an Account of
Black Friday

Roger Ball
£2.50
Bristol Radical History Group

Autumn 1892 in Bristol saw a violent class war between employers, strike-breaking labour and police on one side and strikers and their mass of working class supporters on the other. Picketing, mass marches and public meetings of thousands of ‘new’ industrial unionists were common, culminating in the use of military and police by the local state to break up a pre-Christmas lantern parade organised to collect money for strikers and their families. This event, which popularly became known as ‘Black Friday’, is an iconic moment in Bristol’s history exposing the relations of force between ‘owners’ and ‘workers’.

 


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• The Bristol Strike Wave of 1889-1890
Socialists, New Unionists and New Women
Part 1: Days of Hope

Mike Richardson

£2.00
Bristol Radical History Group

During 1889-1890, a strike wave swept across Britain hitting many major towns and cities. Bristol was not immune. The scale and intensity of industrial unrest in the city reached a level never experienced before. The city’s labour historian Samuel Bryher depicted Bristol at this time as ‘a seething centre of revolt’. This experience set in train a qualitative change in the organisation of workers; and salutary lessons emerged for consideration for those politically active in the newly formed socialist groups, in their quest to understand the significance of the strikes based upon their philosophical outlook. The self-confidence of workers grew substantially during this period. The emergence of new unionism, representing unskilled and semi-skilled labourers, women and men, was an expression of self-reliance providing an independent organisation for workers’ collective voice. And it was the first time that Bristol women workers would be able to join a general union on an equal footing to men.
This pamphlet, the first of two, charts the tumultuous period that began in September 1889 with a small strike at John Lysaght’s galvanised iron works and ended with a lockout of boot and shoe workers in late December 1889. It was a period that shook the local elite, raising hopes of a new era of labour relations and the potential for bring about a revolutionary change in society. It was also a turning point in the lives of those intimately involved in organising and agitating against poor working conditions, particularly Miriam Daniell, Helena Born and Robert Allan Nicol, members of the Bristol Socialist Society.




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• The Bristol strike wave of 1889-1890
Socialists, New Unionists and New Women
Part 2: Days of Doubt

Mike Richardson
£2.00
Bristol Radical History Group

Following on from part one, this pamphlet traces the period of industrial unrest in Bristol between January and August 1890. The lockout of boot and shoe workers that began in December 1889, and continued for the first few weeks of January 1890, provided the opportunity for combining the forces of skilled organised workers with the unskilled and unorganised, in the drive to improve working conditions. It also encouraged forms of social unionism, with links to the wider community. Employers quickly recovered from their initial shock over the first wave of industrial militancy. Part of the settlement of the boot and shoe lockout was the establishment of a permanent Board of Arbitration for the industry. The Bristol Chamber of Commerce took the initiative in sponsoring a local Board of Arbitration and Conciliation, the purpose of which was to take the sting out industrial militancy.
How the Bristol labour movement responded to this initiative and how it handled the differences that surfaced between organisers who advocated separate unions for women, and stressed welfare over militancy, and those who agitated for an alternative model of unionism open to women and men, are some of the key issues addressed. Despite their strenuous efforts in organising tailoresses in the Bristol area, the difficulties they encountered, and the defeat suffered in a second strike at John Lysaght’s galvanising plant, sowed seeds of doubt in the minds of labour organisers. This may explain why new and old trade unionists were drawn into arbitration and conciliation as a way in which to resolve disputes and establish or maintain a union presence.
While the fervent hopes of the Bristol socialists aroused by the 1889-90 strike wave were not to be realised, Bristol’s working class had appeared on the political, economic and social agenda as a force not to be ignored.

 


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• Coal On the one Hand, Men on the Other
Ian Wright
£4.50
Bristol Radical History Group

The following resolutions were passed at a meeting of Forest of Dean Miners at Speech House in August 1917.
“That we, the Forest of Dean Miners, enter our most emphatic protest against the agent for committing us to the comb-out scheme before first of all ascertaining the view of the miners of the Forest of Dean”.
“That we, the Forest of Dean miners, enter our most emphatic protest against the comb-out scheme which we entirely repudiate, having regard to the fact that we were never consulted.”
“That we, the Forest of Dean miners, call upon the various Trade Unions of this country to take the necessary steps with the view to ascertaining the views of the workers of all countries to negotiate an immediate an honourable peace”.

The miners held the meeting in protest at their agent’s support for the conscription of miners (comb-out scheme). This pamphlet will discuss conflicts within the Forest of Dean Miners’ Association in the years leading up to this meeting and how it impacted on the development of the Association afterwards.
 

 


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• Anarchism in Bristol and the West Country to 1950
Stephen E Hunt
£2.00
Bristol Radical History Group

Firstly some firsts. Bristol M.P. Edmund Burke was the author of what was perhaps the first anarchist tract; Westcountryman Henry ‘Orator’ Hunt first pioneered the use of the mass platform for ‘rabblerousing’ against the establishment; Bristol was the home of the first avowedly atheistic journal. This is a survey of home-grown anarchism, with its roots in a tradition of West Country radicalism.
By the end of the Nineteenth Century explicitly anarchist sensibilities had already emerged as currents from within the labour movement. Alongside such well known anarchist and libertarian socialist celebrities as Peter Kropotkin, William Morris and Edward Carpenter, many other colourful and inspiring characters who believed in ‘The Cause’ were to be found here, in the public halls, on the strike committees and in the countryside of our fine Wessex region.
In the Twentieth Century, the wave of syndicalist new unionism affected the West Country before the First World War, while many locals supported the Spanish Revolution during the 1930s, as did Emma Goldman who spent time in Bristol and Bath (often followed by a ‘brace of detectives from Scotland Yard’).
So let’s put on our wide-brimmed flowerpot hats and black cloaks and wander down to the coffee taverns to see who is around.


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• Life and Times of Joe Thomas

Alan Woodward
£2.00

A short biography of a well-known 20th century libertarian communist militant.




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• The New World:
Perspectives on workers Control in revolutionary
Spain 1936-1939.

Alan Woodward

£3.00



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• News From Everywhere, August 1987
£0.50

A Chronology of everyday class struggle from
all over the world January-July 1987.




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• Call it Sleep
£0.30

Text of a situationist video by Isaac Cronin and Terrel Seltzer.

 


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• South Africa 1985:
The organization of power in Black and White

£0.30



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• France Goes off the Rails;
The movements in France, November 1986-January
1987.

£1.00



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• Modern Times
£0.50

One-off Class struggle magazine, produced 1987.



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• The Bankruptcy of Syndicalism and Anarchism
£0.50

Spanish text from 1979, mainly a critique of the
anarcho-syndicalist CNT and anarchist FAI.


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• Nepal: A Long March towards Bourgeois Democracy
£0.50

A critique of the politics of the Nepali Communist Party; written just before they joined the Nepali government.



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• Strike, Riot and Fire among the Garment Workers:
A Working Class Revolt in Bangladesh

£0.50

An episode in the long-running class war between garment workers and their bosses in one of the sweatshops of the modern world.



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• Pie Any Means Necessary
The Biotic Baking Brigade Cookbook

£4.00

Pieing rightwingers and other hate figures in the face – an indispensable guide.



• Shifting Horizons
Women in the Miners Strike

Lynn Beaton

£2.00



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• The May Days: Barcelona 1937
Freedom Press
£5.95

Anarchists resist attacks by Stalinist-controlled republican forces during the Spanish Civil War.



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• The Tradition of Workers Control
Geoffrey Ostergaard
Freedom Press
£2.00

Anarchist writings on workers control, and running the world from the grassroots.



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Some books and pamphlets published by other people... we have some copies to sell... limited stocks...